When I think about service security – things like the recently broached Playstation Network, or any one of a number of such things that hold identity data, security credentials or that are trusted to provide critically important data (like the electronic voting machines in the USA). I’m persistently reminded of claw crane games.

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Mar 21 2011

At no time in history has invasion been a less feasible task than it is now. In the past, it was possible to invade a country and overthrow its government, and then perhaps to withdraw with the country becoming a vassal state, ally, or just no longer a threat.

Those days are long past.

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Jan 13 2011

The chair of the US House Committee on Homeland Security, Peter King, has called to place journalist Julian Assange, editor-in-chief of Wikileaks on a US enemies list. US citizens and treaty nation partners of the USA are forbidden to aid or associate with individuals named on that list.

I rather think he’d better add the editors-in-chief of the New York Times, and the Washington Post – and almost every other newspaper to that list, because they’re all essentially doing (and have always done) the same thing as Assange’s Wikileaks – that is, publishing information that has been leaked by US government officials.

The only differences are that Wikileaks offered US departments the opportunity to redact some of that information – an opportunity not normally granted by publishers, but which the US Government declined – and that major newspapers are rather wishing that they were the ones being leaked to first.

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Everyone seems to be very keen to tell you why Jared Loughner opened fire on a group of people in Tuscon, Arizona – killing six and injuring fourteen.

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